shimmering


verbo
shine with a soft tremulous light.
the sea shimmered in the sunlight
sinónimos: glint, glisten, twinkle, sparkle, flash, scintillate, gleam, glow, glimmer, glitter, wink, coruscate

Faded


verbo
gradually grow faint and disappear.
“the noise faded away”
sinónimos: dim, grow dim, grow faint, fail, dwindle, die away, wane, disappear, vanish, decline, melt away, evanesce
(with reference to film and television images) come or cause to come gradually into or out of view, or to merge into another shot.
“fade into scenes of rooms strewn with festive remains”
(of the ball) deviate to the right (or, for a left-handed golfer, the left), typically as a result of spin given to the ball.
“Logic prevailed, I followed his advice, and the ball faded beautifully onto the green, just as he had predicted.”
(in craps) match the bet of (another player).
“Lovejoy faded him for twenty-five cents”

Stood


Definiciones de stand
verbo
have or maintain an upright position, supported by one’s feet.
Lionel stood in the doorway
sinónimos: be on one’s feet, be upright, be erect, be vertical
(of an object, building, or settlement) be situated in a particular place or position.
the town stood on a hill
sinónimos: be, exist, be situated, be located, be positioned, be sited, have been built
be in a specified state or condition.
since mother’s death, the house had stood empty
withstand (an experience or test) without being damaged.
small boats that could stand the punishment of heavy seas
be a candidate in an election.
he stood for Parliament in 1968
provide (food or drink) for someone at one’s own expense.
somebody in the bar would stand him a beer
Menos definiciones

Pride


sustantivo

  • a feeling or deep pleasure or satisfaction derived from one’s own achievements, the achievements of those with whom one is closely associated, or from qualities or possessions that are widely admired.
    “the team was bursting with pride after recording a sensational victory”
    sinónimos: pleasure, joy, delight, gratification, fulfillment, satisfaction, a sense of achievement
    a group of lions forming a social unit.
    “First in were wildebeest, zebras and giraffes, and then, after ten years, predators were introduced – two prides of lions, cheetahs and a pack of wild dogs.”
    verbo
    be especially proud of a particular quality or skill.
    “she’d always prided herself on her ability to deal with a crisis”

Sinónimos
sustantivo

  • self-esteem, pleasure, arrogance, best, source of satisfaction, pridefulness
    self-esteem, dignity, honor, self-respect, self-worth, self-regard, pride in oneself
    pleasure, joy, delight, gratification, fulfillment, satisfaction, a sense of achievement
    arrogance, vanity, self-importance, hubris, conceit, conceitedness, self-love, self-adulation, self-admiration, narcissism, egotism, superciliousness, haughtiness, snobbery, snobbishness, big-headedness, vainglory
    best, finest, top, cream, pick, choice, prize, glory, jewel in the crown
    source of satisfaction, pride and joy, treasured possession, joy, delight
    pridefulness

verbo

  • congratulate
    congratulate, plume

Scorn


sustantivo

  • the feeling or belief that someone or something is worthless or despicable; contempt.
    “I do not wish to become the object of scorn”
    sinónimos: contempt, derision, contemptuousness, disdain, derisiveness, mockery, sneering
    verbo
    feel or express contempt or derision for.
    “I was routinely ridiculed and scorned by conservatives and liberals alike”
    sinónimos: deride, hold in contempt, treat with contempt, pour/heap scorn on, look down on, look down one’s nose at, disdain, curl one’s lip at, mock, scoff at, sneer at, jeer at, laugh at, laugh out of court, disparage, slight, dismiss, thumb one’s nose at, turn one’s nose up at
    Sinónimos

sustantivo

  • contempt, disdain
    contempt, derision, contemptuousness, disdain, derisiveness, mockery, sneering
    contempt
    disdain, contempt, despite

verbo

  • deride, spurn, despise
    deride, hold in contempt, treat with contempt, pour/heap scorn on, look down on, look down one’s nose at, disdain, curl one’s lip at, mock, scoff at, sneer at, jeer at, laugh at, laugh out of court, disparage, slight, dismiss, thumb one’s nose at, turn one’s nose up at
    spurn, rebuff, reject, ignore, shun, snub
    spurn, disdain, pooh-pooh, turn down, freeze off, reject
    despise, disdain, contemn

Blind


adjetivo

  • unable to see; sightless.
    “she suffered from glaucoma, which has left her completely blind”
    sinónimos: sightless, unsighted, visually impaired, visionless, unseeing, partially sighted, purblind, as blind as a bat
    lacking perception, awareness, or discernment.
    “he’s absolutely blind where you’re concerned, isn’t he?”
    sinónimos: imperceptive, unperceptive, insensitive, slow, obtuse, uncomprehending, stupid, unintelligent, dense, dim, thick, dumb, dopey, dozy; unmindful of, mindless of, careless of, heedless of, oblivious to, insensible to, unconcerned about, indifferent to; uncritical, unreasoned, unthinking, unconsidered, mindless, undiscerning, indiscriminate
    concealed or closed, in particular.
    (used in emphatic expressions) not the slightest.
    “you don’t know a blind thing!”
    drunk.
    “Originally the upper floor housed the council chambers, while the underneath had a storeroom and a blind house, where drunks were locked up for the night.”

sustantivo

  • people who are unable to see.
    “guide dogs for the blind”
    an obstruction to sight or light, in particular.
    something designed to conceal one’s real intentions.
    “he phoned again from his own home: that was just a blind for his wife”
    sinónimos: deception, smokescreen, front, facade, cover, pretext, masquerade, feint, camouflage, trick, ploy, ruse, machination
    a heavy drinking bout.
    “he’s off on a blind again”
    a legitimate business concealing a criminal enterprise.
    “The third time he wins, and afterward uses a big-town barber shop as a blind for his elaborate gambling house.”

verbo

  • cause (someone) to be unable to see, permanently or temporarily.
    “the injury temporarily blinded him”
    sinónimos: make blind, deprive of sight, render sightless, put someone’s eyes out
    deprive (someone) of understanding, judgment, or perception.
    “a clever tactician blinded by passion”
    sinónimos: deprive of judgment, deprive of perception, deprive of reason, deprive of sense

adverbio

  • without being able to see clearly.
    “he was the first pilot in history to fly blind”

Hurt


sustantivo

  • physical injury; harm.
    “Actual bodily harm is any hurt or injury calculated to interfere with the health and so called comfort of the victim and must be more than merely trivial or transient.”
    verbo
  • cause physical pain or injury to.
    “Ow! You’re hurting me!”
    sinónimos: injure, wound, damage, abuse, disable, incapacitate, maim, mutilate, wrench, bruise